Learn to Read Russian in 15 Minutes


So here’s a really simple and interesting breakdown of the Russian alphabet from writer Peter Starr Northrop and cartoonist Ryan Estrada. Take a few minutes of your time and before you know it you’ll be confidently sounding out Russian words. It may be one of the hardest languages to learn but these practical tips here will be the beginning of how to learn this exciting language.

bCiPTU5

For more about Learning Russian click here. See more from Northrop and


11 thoughts on “Learn to Read Russian in 15 Minutes

  1. I’m going to archive this Steve and refer to it from time to time. Our daughter-in-law tipped us to the fact that it was based on the Greek language. She’s Macedonian.
    Leslie

    1. It want’ based in Greek Language. ONLY the Cyrilic script \ letters partially(!) based on Greek letters.
      Partially b\c before creating of cyrilic script russians (and other slavic ppl) had AzBuka which used in different times Bukvica, Glagolitsa and some Runs (runic scripts).

      Bukvitsa was something like this:

      Glagolitsa was somthing like this:

      Exist a lot of testimonies about russian pre-Christian scripts espcially from Persian, Arabic and Middle East sources and even some Euroepnian tribes hronists – such ones from: Thietmar von Merseburg, Mubarak-shah Marvarrudi, Ahmad ibn Fadlān ibn al-Abbās ibn Rāšid ibn Hammād, Abu’l-Faraj Muhammad bin Is’hāq al-Nadim, Al-Mas‘udi (Abu al-Ḥasan ʿAlī ibn al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAlī al-Masʿūdī) and some others around the world.

      Russian language itself is based not on Greek language, but on Sanskrit(they both are ones of the closest ones distant languages on the planet) with big influence of various turkic (don’t confuse with turkish!) words roots and very little bit of persia ones.

      1. In my late years in scholl and later in University i used glagolitsa script + some kind of runic style code for digits and math symbols which i developed myself to make some crib\trot\pony sheets before some exams. So even if teacher or professor was been capturing me during cribing or looking for some formulas from those crib sheets they always were unable to prove that b\c of the codding i used. 😀

  2. I remember having conversations with people about this when I lived in Beijing. There is an area that had many many (tasty) Russian restaurants, but it took me the longest time to get around to asking someone about the ‘pectopah’ (me fully pronouncing that as ‘peck-toe-paw’) signs everywhere.

    Having someone patiently explain that the P was an R, and the C was an S, and the H was an N was truly a breakthrough moment; however, that’s as far as I ever got with learning the Cyrillic alphabet. I still use this example to explain to people how our English-speaking instincts steer us incorrectly when reading Chinese pinyin (i.e. Xi’an, Qi Gong, etc.).

    Great post— I’ll have to bookmark this one!

    1. Beijing? – Yabao Lu street?

      In don’t know about Beijing(never been there), but be carefull in Harbin and Liaodong. 😉
      There are a lot of pseudorussian restaurants as well as fake pseudorussian products(incl. food),which usually are made by some local chinese folks and have pretty low quality.
      Knowing Russian language usually helps a lot b\c on fake “russian” products a lot of mistakes usually can be found. )
      Just watch the local Chinese ppl if they go to exact restaurant or buy exact “russian” goods\products\food – then you can do the same. Local folks there know what is original and of good quality. 😀

      1. That’s the one! I also lived in Liaoning, but in Dandong with more DPRK influence, as opposed to some of the parts of the Northeast with more Russian contact. I do remember seeing more Russian influence when we went up to Harbin for the Ice Lantern Festival.

        Anyway, I take your point though–many kinds of pseudocuisines for sure!

      2. He-he, yeah why not to dupe some naive tourists or dumb laowai, afterall? =)))

        Very interesting might be Xinjiang Weiwuer Region…however i don’t if westerners a free to go there or not.
        For russians and ppl from former Soviet States – actually no any problems.

        Very interesting region of China in all senses beging from the cetre city Urumchi \ Wulumuqi and ending by many small ones towns…i.e. chinese type small one towns (i hope you understand me LOL).
        From very interesting and diffrent(from rest of the China) pretty diverse and TASTY cuisines and clean\safe food products to pretty beautiful nature. There you can find also some Russian cultural influence as well as Kazakh and Mongolian one and other nerby coutries. “Small” cities are especially interesting.. you get impression that you are not in China but somewhere in Middle Asia. Nerby the border exist free trade zones\regions with neihb. coutries in the form of cooperation towns – there one can do some really interesting and pretty unique shopping.

  3. That’s the one! I also lived in Liaoning, but in Dandong with more DPRK influence, as opposed to some of the parts of the Northeast with more Russian contact. I do remember seeing more Russian influence when we went up to Harbin for the Ice Lantern Festival.

    Anyway, I take your point though–many kinds of pseudocuisines for sure!

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