East or West your New Russian Home will always be the Best – Or Escaping Liberal Totalitarianism in America


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Originally posted on: Pravda

There are about 6.32 million American citizens living abroad, of those about 30,000 chose Russia, according to the Association of Americans Resident Overseas. Over the past 20 years, expatriate communities in Russia, mainly in Moscow and Saint-Petersburg, have been growing substantially. Americans move to Russia for many reasons: education, employment or discovery of a new culture. Some want a Russian experience and some a new home. 

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What’s in your Wallet?

In a recent trend, well-known people from different countries of the world have become Russian citizens. At the same time, Russian liberals and a certain segment of Western media never stop trumpeting about bears in the streets of Russian cities, the “Putin regime” and so on.

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Hey Gerard did it and He has Work

Every such move receives extensive media coverage. A lot of people are familiar with the story of French actor Gerard Depardieu, who became a Russian citizen and started working in Russia as an actor as well.

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Are you Thinking About It?

Roy Jones, an American athlete, became a citizen of Russia after meeting with President Putin. Rumor has it (it is not clear how reliable the rumor is) that Fred Durst, the frontman of Limp Bizkit, is thinking about a Russian passport in his pocket as well. Durst is married to a Russian woman, so it can be possible.

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Lennox Lewis is making the Leap

Another famous athlete, Olympic champion and former undisputed world heavyweight champion in boxing, Lennox Lewis, is going to become a Russian citizen, Vice President of Professional Boxing Federation of Russia Andrei Ryabinsky said.

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How Do you Define Freedom?

Edward Snowden, a former CIA analyst, was forced to seek political asylum in Russia, after he had unveiled many interesting facts about US intelligence to the world. They say that Snowden is living a lot better than the pioneer of Internet revelations, Julian Assange, who has been living in an embassy for years, without being able to go outside. Snowden can travel all across Russia – this is obviously a lot more freedom.

Actors and Actresses Thinking about it

There are foreign journalists that love Russia a lot more than their home lands. Some of them say that freedom of speech works a lot better in Russia. Tim Kirby, a video blogger and a TV presenter at RT, wants to obtain the Russian citizenship.

Famous Athletes that hold Russian Passports

Foreign athletes see Russia as their second homeland as well. During the Winter Olympics in Sochi, it became known that snowboarder Vic Wild had obtained Russian citizenship. Viktor Ahn, a short track champion, became a citizen of the Russian Federation as well. There were athletes, who obtained Russian citizenship prior to the Winter Olympics in Sochi. Yuko Kawaguti, a Japanese skater, became a citizen of Russia in 2008. Two American basketball players, Rebecca Linney Hammon and Deanna Nolan, received Russian passports the same year.

Comrade-Obama-610x400Liberal Totalitarianism in America

In search for freedom, Europe and America have come to the point that is referred to as “liberal totalitarianism” and “dictate of minorities.” The people, who see it and do not want to live in this, – they pack their bags and go to Russia – the country of traditional values in the ocean of ultra-liberalism.

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Statue of Mowgli, Priozersk, Russia

And with a bit of tongue and cheek apparently, the image of “cold and wild Russia” has been getting vague both inside and outside Russia. People realize that it will be a lot more comfortable for them to live and work in Russia. Actors, scientists and athletes used to move to the United States of America. They were going there in search for the American dream. The dream has come true for just a few of them.

Now we can see foreigners coming to Russia for the Russian dream. These new citizens will become real patriots of our country, as it is hard not to love Russia. Loving Russia is easy, pleasant and natural.

 

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16 thoughts on “East or West your New Russian Home will always be the Best – Or Escaping Liberal Totalitarianism in America

  1. You know what I can tell you. For people with no knowledge about real Russian life your posts for sure are interesting reading, especially when it comes to architecture, literature, culture. However, for those who know life there from their own experience everything what you write is just your personal opinion which you gathered in your three years in Russia. You are still tourist there. It takes time to penetrate and understand their life. For those who suffered a lot from Soviet regime rest of the World is like a resort.
    Life in Moscow and St.Petersburg is not a real experience to learn about real one. Even other big cities there do not have the same opportunities. And I even do not want to talk about rest of Russia. Take the train and go only 100-150 kilometers from Moscow to some small towns and you will find absolutely unacceptable life. I would be happy to be wrong and find there already a thriving life. But I am pretty sure it is not like that.
    Do not blame Saudi and your native country US with the low cost oil. The oil era has gone. Russia had golden era for decade and got trillions dollars which have been stolen or spent on funny projects (Olympic Games and other). They did not invest in their people, in daily life for simple citizens. They even ruined all what they had after Soviet Union collapsed. And now they blame all the West in their problems. It was like that all the time in long Russia and Soviet Union history.
    Life is wise and it’ll show who is right and who is wrong. The only thing, it can happen we will not see that if these two monsters will not find compromise.
    Sorry, it is only my humble opinion.
    Have a nice day!

    1. Alexander, actually I own property not far from Smolensk, and yes life is tough here in Russia. Always has been, always will be. That’s a given. Yes, I grew up in the States and things were good then that’s for certain. I’ve read much about Russian history, even it’s ancient history. A lot of it is tragic as well. Life was never meant to be a bed of roses. But from your talk, I can hear the voice of someone who has experienced it first hand. Am I right? My blog is only a tiny glimpse of what Russia is really like. My ambition has always been to enlighten people to the Russia that I’ve experienced. I wish I could say it’s all been positive, but that would be a lie. Some of it is very hard, maybe I am still a tourist, I’ve questioned that myself for sure. But I’ve chosen to show a different side of Russia. It’s not all bad, I’ve found some extraordinary beauty in Russia. It’s landscapes are just as beautiful as America’s, funny thing is very few Russians even know it exists. The other thing I’ve tried to get across is that America is in trouble, it’s president is very much a socialist if not a communist or at least has this thinking deeply embedded into if mind. It’s also terrifying that so few see it. I suspect America could see something very similar to what happened to Russia. Why the Russians in the States aren’t speaking about it is beyond me. Anyway I do appreciate your comments. I will extend an offer, would you like to be a guest blogger on my blog? It’s always good to get a balance and mix of views. Thanks.

      1. To be short. I lived in Soviet Union for 46 years. Believe me it was not easy decision to leave the country where I left my best years, relatives, friends and much more. It was time after 1991 collapse when people start to believe in their future. But it was only dream. And that dream collapsed with new government and president. Unlike US where president is like a communist, he is going to go on this coming November. Nobody knows if the new one is going to be better. However there is the chance. In Russia president is forever if nothing happens. Every single day, month, year nothing is changed for better, no perspective. It is syndrome – Groundhog Day!
        I had an opportunity because of my work to travel from the west to the Far East, and from north to south. It last ten years and I saw a lot of people, places and different cultures of that huge country. People are great but they are not treated by government as they deserve. It is sad and pity to see that. They are brainwashed in most and it seems they do not believe they can change anything.
        It is impossible to describe all of my feeling in that short conversation.
        Believe it or not I missed a lot there but in seventeen years of my Canadian life I did not regret one minute about my decision to leave.
        Nice to talk to you and read your posts. Keep going. Thank you for your invitation to be the guest blogger. I am still full time employee and do not have much time for the writing. Beside of that I am not as fluent in English. This is why sometime it is difficult to send the right message to the readers. Anyway, if I can do anything I’ll do.
        Have a nice evening!

      2. Thanks Alexander, just reading this is interesting. I believe Canada has some great things in store for it. I tried to figure out once how to move there without a lot of success. Either way just having your insights from time to time would be invaluable.

      3. It is interesting to read you Alexander.

        You obviously don’t know a lot about modern Russia.
        17 years it is long time. It is really changed a lot and keep doing so – i see during last 10 years.

        That is why i find some irony reading you.

        Also as i can see you from Baltic States (physically or by family tree). And it is well know fact that Baltics is a historical epicentre of russophobia. That is also explains a lot in your speech.

        Addiotionaly middle aged or over-middle-aged emigrants of the first and secons waves after USSR collapse also very often expressed some kind of soviethate, what later\today transformed into russophobia.

        And now after 15-25 years many of them continue to express hate…. Moreover even having pretty hard times\life in they new motherland they will continue to tell how better there and how bad is in Russia. I PERSONALY KNOW SUCH PPL!

        Even more – today and esp. 2 years ago(before all this political mess) such ppl seeing development and positive economic trends in Russia became even more angry…b\c some of them probably would like to return …but after 20 years they just can’t. They don’t belong anymore to Russia – they will be lost there and they know it and makes them angry )))

        These ppl are kind of “russians” abroad who happy about the sanctions, who are happy about the war, who happy about any trouble Russia have.

        So, Alexander i feel sorry for, but i thank you for your honest posts.

      4. Alexander, one more thing.
        I wanted to comment a lot about your em… ,lets say, not very ground allegations like ” For those who suffered a lot from Soviet regime”, “Even other big cities there do not have the same opportunities”, “The oil era has gone” (omfg), “They did not invest in their people, in daily life for simple citizens” (purely hilarious new investment def-on! lol), “They even ruined all what they had after Soviet Union collapsed” and many others…

        BUT instead i want to ask you only ONE QUESTION:

        ***********”ARE YOU MARRIED, Alexander? Do you have a female wife?”***********

        I have some intuition, considering your speech, style, “arguments” and general worldview…. you know… )

  2. I thought the original blog was interesting – but (no offense) not as interesting as the comments by Alexander and Barbarian. The two most interesting sentences came from Alexander – “People are great but they are not treated by government as they deserve.” and “They … do not believe they can change anything.” I think both those can likely be applied to very many countries. Alexander – I hope you will accept the invitation to be a guest blogger, your English is fine.

    1. Isn’t it funny, the comments are more lively than the post. I used to try to moderate the comments, but than I thought that’s a lot like…………..well I think you get the idea. And just like yourself I’d love it if Alexander would do a guest post.

      1. Actually , Steeve, it is the most distinguishing feature of you from any other westerner blog. You don’t moderate it heavely and allow various thoughts. At 99% of the western blogers or even in any live media source any “unsuitable” comments are censored in 99% of the cases. “Freedom of speech”… yeah 😉

        Thanks you for that and pls keep it that way. 😉

        Respectfully,

      2. Steve, here is VERY interesting text from part of Stalins speech about economic troubles of socialism in 1951 year. Shortly after WWII. Extreemely interesting things he said, which are totaly opposite to the situation we have globaly and to principles which are propaganded around the globe. I found them extreemly sound. Hope you will be able to translate.. b\c we hear so much bullshit about capitalism, socialism communism and other usually empty “ISM” terms.

      3. Interesting…. The poorest president in the world José Alberto “Pepe” Mujica says things very close to those one said by Stalin in the video above.

        The interview of José Mujica now available only in Spanish and Russian, hope soon it will be translated to English too.

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