Mirror Reflections – Kiribati & Russia


200705294451H_LargePhoto by: Widescreen Photography

Life in Kiribati

From the sky, the country of Kiribati looks like strands of yarn floating on the sea: 33 tiny islands, scattered across an area of the Pacific Ocean more than twice the size of Alaska.

Nearly half the population, more than 40,000 people, is crowded into just one of those strands –- the capital island, South Tarawa.

The average height of the islands is approximately 6.5 feet. Already, land is scarce, and drinking water can be in short supply. There’s nowhere to retreat.

So concerns about climate change are felt very acutely here. Though estimates are rough, scientists predict average sea levels could rise as much as 3 feet by the end of the century owing to global warming.

At the most recent round of United Nations climate negotiations in Cancun, Mexico, Kiribatian President Anote Tong said the rising sea could “ultimately lead to the demise of island countries like Kiribati.

– See more at: http://tcktcktck.org/2011/02/climate-change-faith-collide-kiribati-npr/8288#sthash.Z6VnX71z.dpuf

From the sky, the country of Kiribati looks like strands of yarn floating on the sea: 33 tiny islands, scattered across an area of the Pacific Ocean more than twice the size of Alaska.

Nearly half the population, more than 40,000 people, is crowded into just one of those strands –- the capital island, South Tarawa.

The average height of the islands is approximately 6.5 feet. Already, land is scarce, and drinking water can be in short supply. There’s nowhere to retreat.

So concerns about climate change are felt very acutely here. Though estimates are rough, scientists predict average sea levels could rise as much as 3 feet by the end of the century owing to global warming.

At the most recent round of United Nations climate negotiations in Cancun, Mexico, Kiribatian President Anote Tong said the rising sea could “ultimately lead to the demise of island countries like Kiribati…………..

Visit: http://tcktcktck.org/2011/02/climate-change-faith-collide-kiribati-npr/8288

Kamchanka-Russia-Chris-BurkardPhoto by: Chris Burkard

Life in Russia

 

Global warming will have a stronger impact on Russia than on the rest of the northern hemisphere and the world”, he said to Interfax according to Vesti.

“The intensity of the warming will be about twice as high here”, Frolov said.

During the last 40 years, the average temperature in Russian has increased 0.4 degrees every ten years. The global warming can been seen through higher air temperatures, reduction in ice cover and snow cover, higher sea levels, Frolov said and reminded that the Arctic ice cover last year reached a record low.

In October this year Norwegian and Russian scientists said that the surface water of the Barents Sea was 5 degrees C warmer than normal. They linked the peak-temperatures with the unusual warm summer in the northernmost parts of mainland Norway and on Russia’s Kola Peninsula……….

Visit: http://barentsobserver.com/en/nature/2013/11/russia-most-affected-global-warming-12-11

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