Mirror Reflections – Brunei Darussalam & Russia


Sunda Flying Lemur

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“Wild” Life in Brunei Darussalam

Also named the Sunda Flying Lemur or the Malayan Flying Lemur. The Sunda Flying Lemur, also known as the Malayan Flying Lemur, is a species of colugo, not lemur. Until recently, it was thought to be one of only two species of flying lemur, the other being the Philippine Flying Lemur which is found only in the Philippines. It is comparable to a medium-sized possum or a very large squirrel. They have moderately long, slender limbs of equal length front and rear, a medium-length tail, and a relatively light build. The head is small, with large, front-focused eyes for excellent binocular vision, and small, rounded ears. Their most distinctive feature is the membrane of skin that extends between their limbs and gives them the ability to glide long distances between trees.

Russian Flying Squirrel

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“Wild” Life in Russia

The Russian Flying Squirrel is about 15 centimeters long, weighs around 100 grams. It glides from tree to tree using a membrane that stretches between the front and back legs. For this ability to glide, the Russian Flying Squirrel has developed an “energy-saving method of movement” that does not require it to use very much of its own physical power. A champion of the “eco-life,” this resourceful squirrel also “recycles” nests that woodpeckers have finished using as their own roosts and preserves its own energy by eating the buds of a tree at only one spot

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