Mirror Reflections – Madagascar & Russia


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Global importance of Madagascar‘s Lemurs

According to Russell Mittermeier in The Eighth Continent although Madagascar is only one of 92 countries with wild primates populations, it is alone responsible for 21 percent (14 of 65) of all primate genera and 36 percent (5 of 14) of all primate families, making it the single highest priority for primate conservation. Madagascar is important for primates that primatologist divide the world into four major regions: the whole of south and central America, all of southern and southeast Asia, mainland Africa, and Madagascar which ranks as a full-fledged  region all by itself.

According to Russell Mittermeie
Global importance of Madagascar’s lemurs
Global importance of Madagascar’s lemurs
According to Russell Mittermeier in The Eighth Continent, although Madagascar “is only one of 92 countries with wild primate populations, it is alone responsible for 21 percent (14 of 65) of all primate genera and 36 percent (five of 14) of all primate families, making it the single highest priority” for primate conservation. “Madagascar is so important for primates that primatologists divide the world into four major regions: the whole of South and Central America, all of southern and southeast Asia, mainland Africa, and Madagascar, which ranks as a full-fledged region all by itself. – See more at: http://www.wildmadagascar.org/wildlife/lemurs.html#sthash.1OEGTo62.dpuf
Global importance of Madagascar’s lemurs
According to Russell Mittermeier in The Eighth Continent, although Madagascar “is only one of 92 countries with wild primate populations, it is alone responsible for 21 percent (14 of 65) of all primate genera and 36 percent (five of 14) of all primate families, making it the single highest priority” for primate conservation. “Madagascar is so important for primates that primatologists divide the world into four major regions: the whole of South and Central America, all of southern and southeast Asia, mainland Africa, and Madagascar, which ranks as a full-fledged region all by itself. – See more at: http://www.wildmadagascar.org/wildlife/lemurs.html#sthash.1OEGTo62.dpuf

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Last region of Muskox in Asia

Taymyr Peninsula is a peninsula in Siberia that forms the most northern part of mainland Asia. It lies between the Yenisei Gulf of the Kara Sea and the Khatanga Gulf of the Laptev Sea in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia. Lake Taymyr and the Byrranga Mountains are located within the vast Taymyr Peninsula. The peninsula is the site of the last known naturally occurring muskox outside of North America, which died out about 2,000 years ago.[1] They were successfully reintroduced in 1975.[2] Cape Chelyuskin, the northernmost point of the Eurasian continent, is located at the northern end of the Taymyr Peninsula.

 


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